My Story

     The Healthy Mason Jar was born a couple years after I entered remission from stage 3 breast cancer. After seven months of chemotherapy, lumpectomy and six weeks of daily radiation. I  was dedicated to eating healthy…but life kept getting in the way. Between a full-time job, a member of the Arizona National Guard, doctoral student and mother to five kids  it was hard to increase fruits and vegetables and decrease the junk.


     For me it was easier and tastier to slip back to my bad eating habits. When I tried purchasing salads on the go they were expensive and bowls full of lettuce with a few veggies on the side. I wanted a salad with cancer fighting kale and tons of garden vegetables. That’s when I started chopping and making the salads I love with tasty dressings and packaged in Mason jars. In mason jars they stay fresh when I am on the road and are not contaminated with BPA chemicals known to be found in plastic containers. Eventually, I was able to secure a concession trailer to allow me to help people be healthy on the go so they can stay focused on their busy lives.

History of Mason Jars


I love Mason jars, I mean really, what’s not to love about a Mason jar? It’s made in the U.S.A., serves as a glass, travel-mug, lunch container, leftovers-repository, craft supply storage container. It's the duct tape of containers!

Everyone from every social economic background loves this inexpensive, multi-purpose object that you can reheat things in without worries of BPA. Then I read the history of the Mason jar and I understand how they reached the apple pie, baseball, and hot dog level of Americana!  

John Landis Mason (1832-1902), was an American tinsmith who invented and patented a square-shouldered jar with threaded screw-top, matching lid, and rubber ring for an airtight seal, famously known as the Mason jar in 1858.

Until the 1830s, long before refrigeration and hothouse gardens, many fruits and vegetables had been available only seasonally, but development of jars made canning a practical alternative to drying, pickling, or smoking to preserve food. Older jars were printed with the line "Mason's Patent Nov 30th 1858".

Mason's easy and re-usable jars made home canning popular among American settlers, homesteaders, and even in urban homes. When his patent expired in 1879 Mason jars were manufactured by competitors like the Ball Corporation.

Mason never got rich but his invention has been “trending” for over a century. Made of glass, Mason jars continue to be an easy, safe and of course stylish way to serve food and beverages - especially salads!